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Photographing Wildlife
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Springtime is my favorite time to get outdoors. Its clean, its quiet and the wildlife is prolific, with everyone feeding up after winter time and the does offering you new things to photograph.. Of course you never take a hike without a camera. Particularly in the spring time, when the babies are coming along and the grass and trees are budding and no one is moving overly quickly.

Among the cameras in my arsenal is of course the Canon EOS series. A 10 D is an older model, will get you by very very nicely when its time to photograph some weather or wildlife and won’t cost an arm and a leg. Ebay afficionados can find a nice Canon EOS 10D or 20D setup for under 500 dollars these days and they will offer you a perfect shot from the hip, as it were.

Some of the shots you don’t plan on, and don’ t have time to plan FOR can be accomplished quite nicely with the Canon, as shown here. This gorgeous albino¬† fawn didn’t quite have time to beat feet with their mom before the camera was up and snapping in Tionesta, Pennsylvania.

Springtime also brings out a few critters you’re wishing would have stayed in bed, but the photos are great aren’t they? This rattler was up and moving but not overly curious when the flash went off so he wasn’t a problem for anyone. The deep woods of Pennsylvania brings out timber rattlers that are reasonably long and decently proportioned. Meeting one of them¬† isn’t always pleasant and isn’t all that rare really .So whats a good rule of thumb someone asked me, for photographing rattlesnakes? My ONLY rule of thumb is, if they aren’t behind glass, use a good zoom and stand back.

Although I do recommend a Canon or a Nikon for your wildlife photos, one of the better models that you can use multiple lenses with, the truth is that just about anything you want can offer you a decent photo. Digital cameras hve given us some incredible new freedom with regard to images. Disposables offer us great photos and a lower cost if we drop it or lose it, while the lower priced digitals can afford you a decent image. For example, the photo below was taken with a FinePix camera, which isn’t top range, but as you can see, it does a relatively good job when the subject isn’t a quick mover.

These folks were captured at LE Ray Lake near Grand Island Nebraska.

Get out there, now that spring is on top of us. Get hiking.. and don’t forget your camera..

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